Every day it happens to countless Americans, and it has statistically already happened to you: a speeding ticket. Speeding tickets can and will be issued for any speeding offense that is over the posted speed limit. That means, if a police officer wants to, they can stop you for going 31 in a 30 mph posted area. What you may already know about speeding tickets is that they cost you either time or money (sometimes both), but incurring multiple speeding tickets can land you in trouble. Here’s why you should take that speeding ticket seriously:

Looking over the left shoulder of a person driving

Cost & Speed

In New Hampshire, speeding tickets fines for your first offense are issued on a basis as follows:

  • If you exceed 1-10 miles per hour over the posted limit, and the posted speed limit is 55 mph or less: $62
  • If you exceed 11-15 miles per hour over the posted limit, and the posted speed limit is 55 mph or less: $93
  • If you exceed 16-20 miles per hour over the posted limit, and the posted speed limit is 55 mph or less: $124
  • If you exceed 21-25 miles per hour over the posted limit, and the posted speed limit is 55 mph or less: $248
  • If you exceed 26+ miles per hour over the posted limit, and the posted speed limit is 55 mph or less: $434
  • If you exceed 1-5 miles per hour over the posted limit, and the posted speed limit is 65 mph or less: $80.60
  • If you exceed 6-10 miles per hour over the posted limit, and the posted speed limit is 65 mph or less: $124
  • If you exceed 11-15 miles per hour over the posted limit, and the posted speed limit is 65 mph or less: $186
  • If you exceed 16-20 miles per hour over the posted limit, and the posted speed limit is 65 mph or less: $310
  • If you exceed 21+ miles per hour over the posted limit, and the posted speed limit is 65 mph or less: $434
  • If you exceed 1-5 miles per hour over the posted limit, and the posted speed limit is 65 mph or less: $80.60
  • If you exceed 6-10 miles per hour over the posted limit, and the posted speed limit is 65 mph or less: $124
  • If you exceed 11-15 miles per hour over the posted limit, and the posted speed limit is 65 mph or less: $248
  • If you exceed 16-20 miles per hour over the posted limit, and the posted speed limit is 65 mph or less: $372
  • If you exceed 21+ miles per hour over the posted limit, and the posted speed limit is 65 mph or less: $496

That means if you’re doing 70 on the highway, and the posted speed limit is 65, you could incur a fee of $80.60 (or more if it’s your second or third offense) – plus any demerit points added to your license. You can also expect any auto insurance policies you may have to increase in price if you incur a speeding ticket.

Demerit Points

It’s true that if you break too many motor vehicle laws, you will accrue too many demerit points on your license, and your license will be suspended. Suspension of a license in NH happens at 12 points accumulated in two calendar years, and will result in a six month suspension of your license. If you rely on your car to get you to and from work or school, then you want to do everything you can to keep from reaching this limit. Since speeding violations can result in 3-4 demerit points on your license, that means it only takes 3-4 offenses within two years to lose your license.

Expiration of demerit points

Demerit points can be considered no longer on your license after five years from the date of conviction. That means it takes much longer for these points to go away, and if you keep accruing traffic violations, including speeding tickets, you could risk having your license revoked.

Fighting a speeding ticket

When you send along a check to pay for your speeding violation, you are admitting that you were caught speeding by an officer and accepting the penalty (essentially pleading guilty or no contest), including the points on your license. You can try to avoid having to pay the fine, as well as the points on your license, by challenging the speeding ticket in court. 

There are specific challenges for fighting a speeding ticket in court. You will need to ensure that you hire an attorney to represent you, or you represent yourself. You will need to take time out of work or school to attend court. Whether or not you are found guilty after your case hearing, you will still owe court and/or attorney fees, and by fighting a ticket in court, you are not guaranteed to win. Many people have heard from friends or family members of officers who did not show up to a court hearing which meant they automatically won their case, but this is not often the case. You will want to be prepared for an outcome that may be more expensive than just paying the ticket.
Still, if fighting a speeding ticket in court is your last resort prior to losing your license, you should employ professional help. Bernstein & Mello, PLLC can help represent you fairly and honestly in a motor vehicle hearing. Contact us today to get started.

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